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Grant’s Getaways: Candy Cane Express

Posted by on Dec 10, 2019 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Grant’s Getaways: Candy Cane Express

Each weekend morning in December, railroad engineer Tim Thompson, preps the business end of the “Candy Cane Express:” a Prairie 2-6-2 steam engine that roars to life in billowy clouds of steam.
“When one of these steam locomotives is hot, they really attract a crowd,” said railroad engineer Tim Thompson. The engine was built in 1925 and it burns recycled motor oil and it is rated to pull 29,000 pounds. “It’s like a big industrial furnace,” added Thompson. “The firebox is surrounded by a water jacket and as it boils, the steam rises and moves through super heater units and then down into the cylinders to move the train.”

The Candy Cane Express (owned and operated by the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad) takes on passengers at the Garibaldi Depot three times each Saturday and Sunday (10am, Noon and 2pm) for a 90-minute round-trip ride along the coast.
The steam engine pulls three passenger cars (plus the caboose) and that’s where you’ll find OCSR conductor Dennis Murphy. He said that the rail ride is “big, noisy, and bounces around,” but it’s also “every kid’s dream!”
“It’s one thing to read about a railroad in a book or see them in a museum, but quite a different experience to see them come alive with the steam billowing out of the auxiliary systems and pistons. When you see that, you never forget it!”
The Candy Cane Express rolls along a 3-mile stretch of track from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach and at ten miles an hour it is a pleasant cruise.
“We go right along the water,” said Murphy. “We keep moving north and we go across a lake with water on both sides of the rail, and of course we roll right into downtown Rockaway Beach. It’s just good fun.”
Inside the passenger cars, the holiday lights and greenery mark the season while a Christmas tree, heavy with ornaments, stands in passenger car corner.
Suddenly, a jolly old man greets young and old with a huge smile.

“Oh, there’s somebody I need to see,” said the man in a bright red suit who offered that the Candy Cane Express isn’t so much about him, but the people he meets along the way.
“If I can get a smile out of a child, well, that’s all the reward anyone could ask for.”
Nine-year-old Keegan Ragan loves to ride on trains because the slow poke, ten mile an hour ride lets him see more of the coastline.
“When our family travels, it’s always by car and cars are small. Aboard the train, I don’t have to sit in one seat, cuz there are many to choose from and with trains you don’t have a seat belt. You can get up and move around and I just like that!”
His parents, Martha and Brad Ragan, agreed that just like many other youngsters, their son has been absolutely hooked on train travel.
“Oh yeah, Keegan has lots of Thomas Trains, model trains, electric trains, Lego trains. It’s his thing, something he’s always been interested in and it hasn’t faded at all the time either. So, this is a perfect trip for our family.”
“Passengers enjoy hot cocoa, Christmas cookies in a nice warm spot that’s out of the rain and wind that we sometimes get here this time of year,” noted Murphy.

Engineer Thompson added, “This ride allows passengers to see that coast, enjoy some down time and even meet Santa Claus, while I take care of the driving. It is a terrific time!”
If you would like to visit more of Oregon – consider a walk on the wild side with my new book: “Grant’s Getaways: Oregon Adventures With the Kids.” You’ll find activities to engage any kid, from archery to clamming on the coast to hunting for thundereggs to zip-lining through trees in an aerial adventure park.
In addition, be sure to check out  “Grant’s Getaways Guide to Wildlife Watching in Oregon.” You will enjoy 48 uniquely Oregon adventures highlighting my fish and wildlife encounters. Scores of colorful photos by “Grant’s Getaways” photographer, Jeff Kastner, show off some of our finest moments in the field.  You can also learn more about many of my favorite Oregon adventures in: “Grant’s Getaways: 101 Oregon Adventures”
The post Grant’s Getaways: Candy Cane Express appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Grant’s Getaways: Team Wraptor

Posted by on Oct 30, 2019 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Grant’s Getaways: Team Wraptor

There’s an unmistakable sound aboard Bill Monroe’s guide boat on Tillamook Bay and it’s not the puttering outboard motor or a splashing silver salmon. Rather, it’s the non-stop laughter from members of Team Wraptor that lets me know I’ve landed in the right boat.

They are four ladies who live to create angling memories — together!
“We just get along so well! We’ve traveled together, we’ve fished together, we build rods together,” said longtime fisher, Pam Magley. ”We encourage each other and there’s no jealousy! You know, ‘Oh she got a fish and I didn’t!’ We are here to encourage each other and support in whatever we want to do.”
Team Wraptor includes Magley, Sara Dodd, Gretchen Dearden and Julie Johnstone. The foursome have been casting and trolling together for years.
Each works for the Wraptor Rod Company of Hillsboro. The company is the brain child of Julie’s husband – Jay Johnstone – who produces custom fishing rods.
Each fishing rod that he builds from the blank up is an original! His artistic and creative talents provide anglers lasting memories that reach beyond a day in the outdoors!
He builds rods for every species of fish; “From trout to tuna,” he said with a broad smile during my recent visit to his company headquarters in Hillsboro. Wraptor Rods custom fishing rods are built with the “best components in the industry,” he added. “From the Rain Shadow blank, to the Alps reel seats, to the Telaxium handles, Wraptor Rods are built to last.”
Wraptor Rods has been Johnstone’s passion for more than a decade and he has built thousands of rods – all by hand. He told me, “Like your finger print – no two Wraptor Rods are the same!”
Magley works with Jay each day to help design fishing gear that is more pleasing to the female eye and more comfortable for women to fish with too. “Years down the road – say, a hundred years down the road, these rods are going to be out there and maybe a grandson – or better, a grand-daughter will have it,” noted Magley. “They are of such high quality that they will be handed down with pride from generation to generation.”
Back on the guide boat, I learned that each member of Team Wraptor had built her own Wraptor Rod! Each is adorned with sparkle that dazzles from colorful marbling that shines in varied hues of greens, teal and even pink.
Sara Dodd told me that she learned about fishing from father who made sure Sara had lots of outdoor time. As a child – she learned both hunting and fishing skills from her dedicated dad.
“It can be intimidating,” admitted Dodd. “I know because I grew up in Southern Oregon, down on the Rogue River. It wasn’t always very pleasant down there cuz it’s s a very male dominant and you stood a real risk to be run out if you weren’t with your husband or significant other or a parent that fished.”
Dodd persisted and learned the value of hiring a good guide like Monroe to help show the way. She said that she had “paid her dues” and is now working as a rep for Wraptor Rods to help encourage more women and more youngsters to get off the couch and get outdoors.
“What is there not to enjoy! You know, to meet people like this and enjoy the warm sunshine too! The stories we get to tell and the experiences that are always new! I just love fishing!”
Bill Monroe Jr is often the Team Wraptor guide and he calls their trips together, “The best research trips ever!”
“I don’t want to be rude to all the guys I take fishing,” said the longtime guide. “But it’s like – it’s more fun! They liven up the boat that’s for sure! It’s a different dynamic is what it comes down to.”
“We do talk a lot more,” added Julie Johnstone. “It seems like when you’re on a boat with men, it’s pretty quiet. When a member of Team Wraptor gets a fish on, it’s pretty darned exciting on the boat with lots of cheering, laughter and just plain fun.”
As if on cue, Dearden’s gorgeous Wraptor Rod doubled down once, twice, three times as the reel screamed! It was a hefty chinook salmon and it peeled line for nearly seventy yards as Dearden stood her ground and wore a mile-wide smile from the thrill of it all.
“Good work Gretch,” said Monroe. He smiled and said that a big bright chinook salmon is “like a muscle with a head and a tail.”
“You’re good, you’re good – lift up the rod, lift, lift, lift,” coached the guide.  Monroe deftly slid the net under the gleaming salmon. “Ok, you’re good, you’re good. Yahoo, it’s in the boat!
The chinook came aboard and Monroe smiled broadly and Dearden was shaking – adrenaline overdrive had arrived. “Oh, my gosh – that first tug – my rod went off and of course I was so excited, and I don’t know – that feeling, that shake – that excitement. I want to fish forever.”
I wondered aloud what advice members of Team Wraptor might offer other women who are tired of watching their men have all this fun?
“Don’t be afraid to come out and do what has always been a man’s sport,” advised Magley. “Just get out and do it! Put a hat on and don’t worry about doing your hair, you don’t need to have any make-up on, just come out and be you.”
“It’s the people! The people you’re with fishing,” added Dearden. “I love it – I’m addicted to it for sure.”
If you would like to visit more of Oregon – consider a walk on the wild side with my new book: “Grant’s Getaways: Oregon Adventures With the Kids.” You’ll find activities to engage any kid, from archery to clamming on the coast to hunting for thundereggs to zip-lining through trees in an aerial adventure park.
In addition, be sure to check out  “Grant’s Getaways Guide to Wildlife Watching in Oregon.” You will enjoy 48 uniquely Oregon adventures highlighting my fish and wildlife encounters. Scores of colorful photos by “Grant’s Getaways” photographer, Jeff Kastner, show off some of our finest moments in the field.  You can also learn more about many of my favorite Oregon adventures in: “Grant’s Getaways: 101 Oregon Adventures.”
The post Grant’s Getaways: Team Wraptor appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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The Adventures of Paul Hughes

Posted by on Apr 27, 2019 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on The Adventures of Paul Hughes

Professional photographer and Manzanita resident Paul Hughes has captured a bit of the world with his lens.
From bamboo rafts in the jungles of Southeast Asia to an attempt to photograph the mythical Loch Ness Monster, Paul hasn’t gathered much moss under his boots.
Paul has traveled 67 countries and 48 states. His photography has been exhibited in England, Germany, Korea, Japan, Mexico, continental U.S. and Hawaii.
Paul lives with his wife in Manzanita, a place they’ve called their home for over 20 years. It also happens to be one his favorite places to photograph.
Paul Hughes is a resident of Manzanita.
“There’s no comparing the light on the Oregon Coast,” he said. “It’s always changing.”
Looking at some of the moments he’s captured along the Tillamook Coast and it’s easy to see what he’s talking about: elk herds huddled together on Manzanita’s golf course; sunlight glowing on the Pacific Ocean; high clouds over Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain; rainbows piercing through rain clouds.
“I love showing people where I live,” he said.
As far as the area’s variety of locales, Paul wonders if he has to pinch himself every time he takes a photo.
“It reminds me of an old sign I once saw: ‘If you’re lucky enough to live by the beach, you’re lucky enough.’ And for those of us living on Oregon’s scenic coast, we are indeed lucky.”
Paul will participate in the Hoffman Center for the Arts May Gallery Show. Visit the Hoffman Center from May 3-May19 to view his work.
Paul “Coastal Cards” are sold locally in the Manzanita Visitors Center and the Garibaldi Museum.
 
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Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Walk Neskowin’s historic homes

Posted by on Apr 24, 2019 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Walk Neskowin’s historic homes

A quick stroll through Neskowin is all it takes to notice the historic charm.
What was once primarily a farming and dairy community, has grown into a beachside neighborhood. Visitors are drawn to the area for the dramatic views of Proposal Rock, but are captivated by the atmosphere of the pristine, sleepy village.
A self-guided, walking tour of the historic Neskowin homes is a must.
Using Jan Boutin’s Historic Neskowin Village by the Sea sketch book, spend the afternoon enjoying one of the Tillamook Coast’s villages. Each page of the sketch book gives a brief history of several Neskowin homes and buildings.

Like the Community Cookhouse.
This Hawk Creek Drive cottage was built in 1910 and is one of the oldest cottages today in Neskowin. It was originally built as a community cookhouse for people who rented tiny sleeping cottages nearby.

Or the cottage of Sally Calkins Maxwell. In the 1950s, Sally, and Jean Spaulding were co-editors of the Yamhill News that reported on local activities in Neskowin. Stories included Mrs. East battling a bat, a flu bug invading town, and Mrs. Nicholas returning from Portland.
 

And some people call Neskowin, Next-of-kin because homes rarely are put up for sale. Such as the Parrot House. This cabin remained within the same family for nearly 100 years after being built in 1914. It gained its name because the owners were often seen walking around with parrots on their shoulders.
Copies of the Historic Neskowin Village by the Sea can be purchased at the Café on Hawk Creek in Neskowin.
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Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Building together with Manzanita Lumber Co. and Stockton’s Nehalem Lumber

Posted by on Apr 1, 2019 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Building together with Manzanita Lumber Co. and Stockton’s Nehalem Lumber

You’re finally building that gazebo that will make summer at the beach house even better.
You have a long list of supplies and an even longer list of questions.
You can wander the sterile caverns of the big box stores.
Or, if you’re lucky enough to live near Manzanita or Nehalem, you can take advantage of two of the longest running lumber yards on the Tillamook Coast: Manzanita Lumber Co. and Stockton’s Nehalem Lumber.
Stockton’s Nehalem Lumber
Not only do both stock everything you need for sprucing up your beach house, they are local institutions staffed by people who always know exactly what you’re looking for.
They both also have deep community ties.
Located on the corner of Hwy 101 and Laneda Avenue, Manzanita Lumber Co. has welcomed visitors to town since the 1940’s. It has been an independent business for 55 years, run by the Stephens family.
Perched in the heart of Nehalem on the slope of Highway 101, Stockton’s Nehalem Lumber has been operating locally since 1960 when Eugene and Dale Stockton partnered to run the business.
Both also take pride in being community hubs and are often the first in line when it comes to lending a helping hand to local causes or events, such as programs at North County Recreation District, Manzanita’s Fourth of July Parade, and relief efforts during the 2016 Manzanita tornado.
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Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Abstract expressionism with Eric Sappington

Posted by on Mar 4, 2019 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Abstract expressionism with Eric Sappington

Scraps of wood, house paint: rubbish to most people.But, when Eric Sappington turns on the electronic music in his studio, those discarded objects become art.Tucked away in the hillside of the Oregon Coast, Sappington creates pieces full of color, texture, and movement that he classifies as abstract expressionism.“It’s all really fluid,” Sappington said. “I get lost in it, and that’s good. Once I figure out something, it happens by accident. I discover out a lot about myself through my own art.”Along with being a visual artist, Sappington is a singer/songwriter.Fans enjoy his laidback-style and dedication to creating an experience, not just a performance.“I’ve never written down my song lyrics, most of them are free flow,” Sappington said. “I just start with a melody or my guitar and start making up words. I let it come to me. I’ve learned to just relax. I have to find a moment that I get locked in and create an experience”Find Sappington with his guitar at the Fairview Grange of Tillamook, first Saturdays for open mic from 6-8 pm. Soup and salad dinner by donation.Sappington’s visual artwork can be viewed at SOURCE in Garibaldi, as well as on his Instagram and Facebook pages.Sappington is also the Associate Artistic Director of the Oregon Coast Children’s Theatre and Centre for the Arts, serving in this position since 2002.  With this organization he leads art and theatre workshops in schools, is a puppet artisan and puppeteer, and helps organize and create public works of art.The post Abstract expressionism with Eric Sappington appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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