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How sweet it is in Pacific City

Posted by on Nov 15, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on How sweet it is in Pacific City

Stepping into Megpie’s Bakery & Cafe is something of a confectionary experience — just as owner Casey Hein planned it.“Downstairs, I wanted it to be warm and cozy, kind of like it was edible,” Casey said. “From the floors to walls … the colors and all the cupcakes around. The pink and the brown and the mint: I kind of wanted it to feel like Neapolitan. Even the floor is speckled. I wanted it to look like chocolate with chocolate chips.” Casey Hein, owner of MegPieUpstairs, it’s kid-friendly by design with game boards decorating the walls, sofas, and a TV creating a clubhouse feel.“The upstairs is for the kids,” said Casey. “I wanted a place for them to go and hang out. There’s not a lot in the Nestucca area for kids.”The little shop on Pacific Ave in the heart of Pacific City serves up daily soups and chowders, burgers, wraps and sandwiches, and no end of desserts, including baskets she’ll deliver or ship that almost look too good to eat.Customer favorites include the oversized breakfast burritos stuffed with potatoes, onions, eggs and of course, bacon.But that’s just the tip of her talents.Casey also caters outside of the restaurant, and creates custom-ordered sculptured cakes. MegPie VW Bus cakeA recent wedding cake took on the shape of a vintage VW bus: mint in color with a white top, windows and even wheels, reflectors, and lights.Megpie’s Bakery & Café is closed Thursday; open weekdays from 7 a.m.-2 p.m. and weekends from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. (open until 5 p.m. on Saturday). Located at 6425 Pacific Ave, Pacific City OR 97112.The post How sweet it is in Pacific City appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Cape Falcon Marine Reserve

Posted by on Nov 13, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Cape Falcon Marine Reserve

Under the waves, the seafloor is largely sand: an ideal habitat for crabs and other animals that like soft bottom habitats.In the shallower waters, there are small isolated patches of rock where diverse marine life such as black rockfish, lingcod, kelp greenling, and buffalo sculpins can be found.The shoreline has rocky intertidal habitats where mussels and sea anemones thrive. Cape Falcon Marine Reserve is brimming with marine life.Photo by Dan HaagThis is a vast portrait of biodiversity and visitors have the opportunity to help build an understanding of what is living on the coastal edge.Established in 2016, The Cape Falcon Marine Reserve (CFMR) is located along the northern tip of the Tillamook Coast, just offshore from popular Oswald West State Park.Hiking trails atop the Cape provide views out over the full expanse of the reserve. Visitors can enjoy beach walking, surfing, and birding from popular Short Sand Beach. Friends of Cape Falcon Marine Reserve offers a variety of educational opportunities to get to know the reserve such as boat tours.“This is an amazing area full of life, energy and excitement,” said Chrissy Smith, outreach coordinator for the reserve. “We want folks to enjoy and appreciate it.”To help in that effort, CFMR partners with a wide variety of local and regional organizations, including Lower Nehalem Community Trust, Lower Nehalem Watershed Council, Haystack Rock Awareness Program, and Surfrider Foundation. They work together to create numerous educational programs such as hikes, boat tours, and workshops. They also recruit volunteers for annual counts of pelicans and cormorants during the summer months. This past summer Friends of Cape Falcon Marine Reserve partnered with other local groups to host a BioBlitz on Neahkahnie Beach.Photo by Dan HaagThis past summer, CFMR held a BioBlitz on Neahkahnie Beach in Manzanita. There, attendees got a close up look at some of the diversity that lives along the beach and in tide pools and help create an inventory.The overall push is to help visitors to CFMR realize that its well-being depends largely on them. Practicing “leave no trace” visitation keeps the area pristine for all to enjoy.There are four other marine reserves along the Oregon Coast, with Cape Falcon being the northernmost location. Cascade Head, Otter Rock, Cape Perpetua and Redfish Rocks Marine Reserves stretch to the south.If you’d like to see what’s happening in CFMR and learn about how you can help their mission, visit them at here.The post Cape Falcon Marine Reserve appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Who has eyes in the back of their head?

Posted by on Oct 5, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Who has eyes in the back of their head?

Did it seem like your mother had eyes in the back of her head?Pygmy Owl chicks may think the same of their mother too.On a sunny, but cold February morning, the ground in the open on Mt. Hebo was bare while frost and a sprinkling of snow persisted in shady patches. The summit had been cold enough that ice columns up to two inches tall formed in the shallow soil. Columnar Ice crystals in the soil on top of Mount Hebo. These form in moist soil during periods of extended freezing temperatures.On the western edge of the opening (where the Air Force Radar Base was razed), a Northern Pygmy Owl was perched on the tip of a spindly 25-foot Douglas Fir. It was sitting in full sun, but in the morning chill it had puffed up like a tennis ball with a silly little tail.Northern Pygmy Owls are the smallest owls found in Oregon, and are quite common in suitable forests statewide. They are cavity nesters, so they need some trees old enough to have woodpecker holes. Although they need these older, larger trees to nest, they commonly hunt on forest edges and in young plantations. They also are more diurnal than most of our owls and can be found out and about well after sunrise. Northern Pygmy Owl, showing yellow eyes.Pygmy owls have large black marks on their napes, outlined in white, that look remarkably like eyes. The function of the pseudo-eyes was debated by ornithologists for years, but consensus now is they function to protect the owl from diurnal raptors. The idea is that a hunting hawk or falcon is less likely waste energy to attack a bird that it “knows” sees it. The element of surprise appears to be lost for the predator.Eyespots are actually found in a lot of organisms, including a variety of moths, caterpillars, and numerous shallow-water fish.Among large moths, a common pattern is to have large and elaborate eyespots on the underwings. Normally while resting these eyespots are hidden beneath the cryptic upperwings, but when a small bird or other predator begins to investigate the moth, it will raise the upper wings and expose the spots.  These look a lot like owl eyes, and the wide spacing and position can make the whole moth resemble the face of a small owl. Polyphemus Moth, showing widely-spaced eyespots.To visit Mount Hebo (and have a chance to spot a Pygmy Owl youself), turn off Hwy 101 in the town of Hebo onto Route 22, for one quarter mile, then left on Mount Hebo road: a two-lane paved Forest Service road.  The top is about eight miles and 3,000 feet above the turnoff.The post Who has eyes in the back of their head? appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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High tide for coastal theatre

Posted by on Sep 14, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on High tide for coastal theatre

Community theatre plays a specific role.  It’s entertaining and often friends, family and neighbors make up the cast.But what happens when a professional actor gets thrown into the mix? Like a high tide, the quality of the production finds a new level.Such is the case of local theatre company Rising Tide Productions—founded by George Dzundza, a resident of Netarts Bay since early 2000. He’s done it all on stages and screens, including starring in movies (The Deer Hunter, Crimson Tide) and in TV series (Law & Order, Grey’s Anatomy).Now retired, he reads plays—lots of plays.Exploring the local community theatre scene, George was reminded that volunteer actors have limited time to work on rehearsals, and believes that time is what is needed to put on a show that has a “ringing effects on an audience.” George DunzdaRising Tide Productions’ guiding philosophy is this: to pursue theatre that will cause audiences to be confronted and debate amongst themselves long after seeing the play.And George is not in a hurry.  He takes time to choose the material and time to cast, rehearse and refine a play—often up to a year—before bringing it to the audience.The results of Rising Tide’s offerings are stunning.“The actors I have the privilege to work with, venture into a long-term commitment of learning the craft,” George explained. “They can then go on to do more plays where they don’t need this kind of intense tutelage.“I respect community theatre because people love doing it. I love doing it and I love doing the kind of material that I feel elevates the audience and gives them insight into worlds.”The post High tide for coastal theatre appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Giving your home that ‘coastal feel’

Posted by on Sep 10, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Giving your home that ‘coastal feel’

So, you stayed in that perfect, little beach cottage this summer. You know, the one right on the beach with the salty air lofting through the windows. The one you where you made memories. The place that you wanted to take home with you.And what if you could? What if, while waiting for your next beach retreat, you could give your home that coastal feel?We’ve talked to some of our local, coastal design experts and here’s what they had to say:  Photo courtesy of Lot 35 Homes Construction + DesignInspiration Designing and decorating can be overwhelming. So where do you start?“Do some introspection by writing down three things that you either did or really loved about the beach and build off that,” Morgan Motsinger of Lot 35 Homes Construction + Design said. “Think about the way it felt to be at the beach and incorporate things that help you remember that feeling. My goal in getting that coastal feel is to not do really obvious choices like pictures of lighthouses or jars of sand. But instead, do what it feels like to be at the beach.”ColorsMotsinger says that whites and tans are helpful for establishing a base and achieving that “light and airy” look.“A lot of white feels like the beach to me, with the sunshine.” Use whites and tans as a base when designing a coastal feel. Photo courtesy of Lot 35 Homes Construction + DesignAnd surprise pops of color will give the space its appeal. Pops of color can bring a space to life. Madeline’s Vintage MarketplacePresident of Roby’s Furniture Andrea Langeliers recommends that you look outside and see what you’re trying to recreate.“If you go and look at a tidepool you can capture a wonderful color palette.”Choose corals, oranges, green, and shades of blue as accent colors in throw pillows, art work, and drapes. Use the local landscape for color inspiration. Roby’s FurnitureTextureNo need to redecorate your whole house to remind yourself of the beach. Textures can easily transform a space. Natural, fiber rugs and thick, cozy croqueted blankets are quick and simple additions to any home.Jennifer, owner of Madeline’s Vintage Marketplace in Tillamook, says that you can mix a lot of different looks to achieve that desired beachy feel.“You can even go contemporary: you can add golds and glass to go upscale.”Add don’t forget foliage of the area. It will “give you another level of texture.” Incorporate local foliage for added texture in a room. Lot 35 Homes Construction + DesignSouvenirs Langeliers says obvious beach décor does have a place, just don’t overdo it. Pick one or two items and incorporate them into your space.“A single shell or a starfish or bedspread that has those designs on it will do.” Pick one or two theme items; don’t overdo it. Roby’s Furniture The post Giving your home that ‘coastal feel’ appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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Raptors flourish in Tillamook’s ‘working landscape’

Posted by on Sep 5, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Raptors flourish in Tillamook’s ‘working landscape’

“Working landscapes” is a hot topic in regards to wildlife populations.The concept refers to landowners using their property for economic benefit, while still maintaining some value as wildlife habitat. The concentration of raptors around Tillamook is a good example of wildlife adapting to a working landscape.Tillamook’s dairy industry relies on high-quality grass and other forage produced by local soils and climate. Voles (aka meadow-mice) have found these pastures to be an attractive habitat. Therefore, the most abundant raptors (eagles, falcons, etc.) around Tillamook are vole eaters, and they have become an integral part of the farm ecology.Among the “best” recent, raptor sighting was of a three-year-old Bald Eagle perched in a small fir tree on the side of Hwy 101 just at the south end of Tillamook. Juvenile Peale’s Peregrine Falcon, a visitor from British Columbia or Alaska.Another highlight was a juvenile Peregrine Falcon in a leafless tree along Boquist Road. This was a Peale’s Peregrine, a visitor from the north. This subspecies lives on the outer coast of British Columbia, southeastern Alaska, and west to the Aleutians where the adults specialize on hunting seabirds out over the ocean.They are mostly resident, but a few, mainly immatures, wander south to Oregon each year. Peregrines habitat practically worldwide, with numerous subspecies, but Peale’s are the biggest, darkest, baddest of the bunch. Dorsally they are nearly black, and young birds have heavy streaking on their underparts extending right up to their throats and cheeks.Remember, when observing these fowl, please respect private property. Stay on public roads, and find good pullouts.  And of course, respect the traffic – look before you step out onto the pavement.The post Raptors flourish in Tillamook’s ‘working landscape’ appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

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