Pages Navigation Menu

Tillamook Advertisting and Radio

High tide for coastal theatre

Posted by on Sep 14, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on High tide for coastal theatre

Community theatre plays a specific role.  It’s entertaining and often friends, family and neighbors make up the cast.But what happens when a professional actor gets thrown into the mix? Like a high tide, the quality of the production finds a new level.Such is the case of local theatre company Rising Tide Productions—founded by George Dzundza, a resident of Netarts Bay since early 2000. He’s done it all on stages and screens, including starring in movies (The Deer Hunter, Crimson Tide) and in TV series (Law & Order, Grey’s Anatomy).Now retired, he reads plays—lots of plays.Exploring the local community theatre scene, George was reminded that volunteer actors have limited time to work on rehearsals, and believes that time is what is needed to put on a show that has a “ringing effects on an audience.” George DunzdaRising Tide Productions’ guiding philosophy is this: to pursue theatre that will cause audiences to be confronted and debate amongst themselves long after seeing the play.And George is not in a hurry.  He takes time to choose the material and time to cast, rehearse and refine a play—often up to a year—before bringing it to the audience.The results of Rising Tide’s offerings are stunning.“The actors I have the privilege to work with, venture into a long-term commitment of learning the craft,” George explained. “They can then go on to do more plays where they don’t need this kind of intense tutelage.“I respect community theatre because people love doing it. I love doing it and I love doing the kind of material that I feel elevates the audience and gives them insight into worlds.”The post High tide for coastal theatre appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

Read More

Giving your home that ‘coastal feel’

Posted by on Sep 10, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Giving your home that ‘coastal feel’

So, you stayed in that perfect, little beach cottage this summer. You know, the one right on the beach with the salty air lofting through the windows. The one you where you made memories. The place that you wanted to take home with you.And what if you could? What if, while waiting for your next beach retreat, you could give your home that coastal feel?We’ve talked to some of our local, coastal design experts and here’s what they had to say:  Photo courtesy of Lot 35 Homes Construction + DesignInspiration Designing and decorating can be overwhelming. So where do you start?“Do some introspection by writing down three things that you either did or really loved about the beach and build off that,” Morgan Motsinger of Lot 35 Homes Construction + Design said. “Think about the way it felt to be at the beach and incorporate things that help you remember that feeling. My goal in getting that coastal feel is to not do really obvious choices like pictures of lighthouses or jars of sand. But instead, do what it feels like to be at the beach.”ColorsMotsinger says that whites and tans are helpful for establishing a base and achieving that “light and airy” look.“A lot of white feels like the beach to me, with the sunshine.” Use whites and tans as a base when designing a coastal feel. Photo courtesy of Lot 35 Homes Construction + DesignAnd surprise pops of color will give the space its appeal. Pops of color can bring a space to life. Madeline’s Vintage MarketplacePresident of Roby’s Furniture Andrea Langeliers recommends that you look outside and see what you’re trying to recreate.“If you go and look at a tidepool you can capture a wonderful color palette.”Choose corals, oranges, green, and shades of blue as accent colors in throw pillows, art work, and drapes. Use the local landscape for color inspiration. Roby’s FurnitureTextureNo need to redecorate your whole house to remind yourself of the beach. Textures can easily transform a space. Natural, fiber rugs and thick, cozy croqueted blankets are quick and simple additions to any home.Jennifer, owner of Madeline’s Vintage Marketplace in Tillamook, says that you can mix a lot of different looks to achieve that desired beachy feel.“You can even go contemporary: you can add golds and glass to go upscale.”Add don’t forget foliage of the area. It will “give you another level of texture.” Incorporate local foliage for added texture in a room. Lot 35 Homes Construction + DesignSouvenirs Langeliers says obvious beach décor does have a place, just don’t overdo it. Pick one or two items and incorporate them into your space.“A single shell or a starfish or bedspread that has those designs on it will do.” Pick one or two theme items; don’t overdo it. Roby’s Furniture The post Giving your home that ‘coastal feel’ appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

Read More

Raptors flourish in Tillamook’s ‘working landscape’

Posted by on Sep 5, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Raptors flourish in Tillamook’s ‘working landscape’

“Working landscapes” is a hot topic in regards to wildlife populations.The concept refers to landowners using their property for economic benefit, while still maintaining some value as wildlife habitat. The concentration of raptors around Tillamook is a good example of wildlife adapting to a working landscape.Tillamook’s dairy industry relies on high-quality grass and other forage produced by local soils and climate. Voles (aka meadow-mice) have found these pastures to be an attractive habitat. Therefore, the most abundant raptors (eagles, falcons, etc.) around Tillamook are vole eaters, and they have become an integral part of the farm ecology.Among the “best” recent, raptor sighting was of a three-year-old Bald Eagle perched in a small fir tree on the side of Hwy 101 just at the south end of Tillamook. Juvenile Peale’s Peregrine Falcon, a visitor from British Columbia or Alaska.Another highlight was a juvenile Peregrine Falcon in a leafless tree along Boquist Road. This was a Peale’s Peregrine, a visitor from the north. This subspecies lives on the outer coast of British Columbia, southeastern Alaska, and west to the Aleutians where the adults specialize on hunting seabirds out over the ocean.They are mostly resident, but a few, mainly immatures, wander south to Oregon each year. Peregrines habitat practically worldwide, with numerous subspecies, but Peale’s are the biggest, darkest, baddest of the bunch. Dorsally they are nearly black, and young birds have heavy streaking on their underparts extending right up to their throats and cheeks.Remember, when observing these fowl, please respect private property. Stay on public roads, and find good pullouts.  And of course, respect the traffic – look before you step out onto the pavement.The post Raptors flourish in Tillamook’s ‘working landscape’ appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

Read More

Artichokes and so much more

Posted by on Aug 30, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Artichokes and so much more

In the coming years, visitors to Bear Creek Artichokes may be in for some pleasant surprises.The Highway 101 market and deli is now in phase one of a three-year plan that will see the 20-acre property return to its roots as a bonafide farm.But no need to wait until then for good eats. Bear Creek chef Josh Delemus has got that covered, says mom and store manager Kathy Delemus. Bear Creek Artichokes is a “must-stop” along Highway 101.“Josh makes incredible soups,” Kathy said. “People have come here and say it’s the best soup they’ve ever had. Seafood chowder, wild mushroom: whatever the spirits moves him at the time. And all are made from ingredients we have here.”Bear Creek also offers sandwiches, including what Kathy calls “adult grilled cheese.”They serve up an artichoke dip with homemade pickled jalapenos, one with bay shrimp, and one with smoked salmon. Tillamook Cheeses, line-caught tuna from Garibaldi, and Rose City Pepperheads are on the shelves, too.“We also have our own pesto — pine nut and toasted walnut,” said Kathy. “Josh does a cilantro almond pesto, hummus, grilling sauce, jams, and when the tomatoes are ripe, we’ll do a salsa.”Try the food at Bear Creek Artichokes for yourself at 19659 Highway 101 in Cloverdale.The post Artichokes and so much more appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

Read More

Grant’s Getaways: Rockaway Beach Kite Festival

Posted by on Aug 17, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Grant’s Getaways: Rockaway Beach Kite Festival

There’s a high-flying reason to visit the Oregon coast this weekend! Kite flyers from across the country are landing in Tillamook County’s Rockaway Beach to show off their talents and their kites.I joined a local man on the sand to discover his passion for the sport and how it has taken him across the world.Phil Burks loves to dig in the sand, but not to build sand castles or harvest razor clams.Rather, it is play with purpose and a way for Burks to anchor his passion.“The foundation of flying our show kites is correctly digging a hole for the sand anchor,” explained Burks. “If you lose this anchor when the wind comes up, you lose all your gear, and I don’t want to lose my kites.”Phil’s wife, Barbara Burks, lends a hand at a time when “caution” is the byword because strong winds can take a toll on your hands.“You can burn your fingers really fast,” noted Burks. “I go through three pairs of gloves each year flying kites, and they can lift you up in the air if the wind is strong. It’s pretty light today, so we’re not in danger.”Burks has been designing his show kites for years —he carefully picks out the rip-stop nylon colors, like a geck- shaped kite called “Happy.”“We named him happy because he’s like a party in the sky and he’s a lot of fun to fly,” noted Burks.Above “Happy” is high-flying “Starsky”—and at more than 100 feet long, Burks explained that he designed it while flying home from a kite festival last fall.“We got invited to fly in a kite festival in Saudi Arabia last year and we were coming back home on the plane from Dubai. It was a 15-hour flight, so I had a lot of time on my hands to come up with something new and more impressive.”“Saudi Arabia?”That’s right! Last November, following a personal invitation from Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince, 33 kite fliers from Canada and the United States arrived in Dubai for a week-long kite flying event. It was a huge celebration that had never happened before.“It was spectacular,” said Burks. “We were treated like royalty, but it was meeting so many people who had never seen anything like our kites that was the best part for me. We got to draw the people in close and get to know them and teach them too. You know, everybody smiles the same too.”Back on the sand at Rockaway Beach, Phil and his friends practiced for the upcoming Rockaway Beach Kite and Art Festival.It was a challenging session because Mother Nature had other ideas, with barely a whiff of wind.Phil smiled and offered, “Well, somedays you just go with the flow.”We first met Phil more than a year ago when he and his kite friends were flying their indoor kites.Indoor kites are flown by using the relative wind provided by the motion of the kite flier, pulling the sail against the still air in a room. The fliers create their own lift by slowly walking backwards, walking in large circles and occasionally pulling on the line.At that time, we learned that kites are used for therapy. You see, Burks is a firefighter with the Hoodland Fire Department near Mt. Hood. In 2013, he suffered what he called a “super concussion.”A firehose with a brass fitting hit him on the head and he said the result was devastating. “I went from being firefighter and honor guard commander and flying outdoor kites to the point that I couldn’t even walk. An accident like mine steals your entire life away.”Indeed, the accident turned Burk’s physical and emotional well-being upside down, but he insisted that learning to fly a small plastic kite made a huge difference to his recovery.“The nice thing is that kites move slow enough that if you’re having overload problems like me—sensory overload—you can keep up with a small indoor kite. Post-traumatic stress disorders, balance problems, brain injuries, limb loss, stroke, even folks in wheelchairs, I’ve worked with them all during my own recovery. I have watched people successfully fly kites and gain confidence and see the return of their motor skills. Kites are magical, and they are how I can stay centered in the world. This is my happy place.”You can contact Phil Burks for more information and even arrange a visit: Pbgonefishing@yahoo.com or 503-348-6510.The Rockaway Beach Kite and Art Festival (August 17-19) is the perfect event for everyone, young and old. This year it is called “Where Dreams Take Flight” and is enjoying its 41st anniversary as a community event. The annual spectacle is where the skies are filled with color and dreams of flight. A sight that will bring a smile to every face.The Rockaway Beach Kite and Art Festival plays host to both professional and amateur kite fliers alike and encourages everyone to get in on the action. The festival offers the opportunity for children to build and learn to fly small kites during special classes.Event organizer Kristine Hayes said it’s a full weekend of fun, as the kites take flight all three days. “Friday and Sunday are our open kite flying days, which are open to everyone,” Hayes said. “On Saturday, there will be performing artists flying about 8-12 synchronized kites all at once; it’s a really great show.”Kite enthusiasts are also encouraged to bring their own kites to fly. In addition to the incredible kites of all sizes, the festival also features some amazing live music, kite exhibitions, an array of incredible vendors and artisans, and tasty meals all weekend. Come hungry, bring a camera and be ready to have some fun.The post Grant’s Getaways: Rockaway Beach Kite Festival appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

Read More

Sitka Sedge State Natural Area now open!

Posted by on Aug 6, 2018 in Visit Tillamook Coast | Comments Off on Sitka Sedge State Natural Area now open!

A new State Park The much-anticipated Sitka Sedge State Natural Area had its grand opening this summer.After the Oregon State Park acquired the “Beltz Farm” property at the south end of Sand Lake, abutting the community of Tierra del Mar, it began its transformation.As a State Natural Area, the site is reserved for passive recreation such as hiking, nature observation, and photography. Development of the property will be limited to a parking area, vault toilet restroom, trails, and habitat restoration.Along with the natural area, the “Beltz Dike Trail” that is already open.The Beltz Dike Trail begins in the middle of the small pasture, extends west then north on the dike for about half a mile, into a tract of vegetated dunes, and then winds over to the beach. The trail is level and currently in good shape. The dike is lined with Sitka Spruce and other trees. It separates the open water of Sand Lake from a large marshy area to the south.Crossbills sighted on Tillamook CoastWhite-winged Crossbills were sighted on the Tillamook Coast at the end of November, which is quite unusual. They are boreal-forest birds, rarely seen in western Oregon. This winter they have been found scattered thinly all along the coast from southwestern Washington to northwestern California. White-winged Crossbill female at Sitka Sedge Trail, January 1 2018.In Tillamook County, they were found close beaches that had scattered Sitka Spruce in fairly open settings. The largest sightings were found at Barview County Park, the Bayocean Spit, and the Sitka Sedge property.To find these birds, carefully examine with binoculars the tops of the trees, as well as the branches bearing cones. Some of the time a bird or two will perch at the top, silhouetted against the sky; otherwise, they will be down on the cones, prying loose the seeds. Sometimes they are by themselves, but more often they are in mixed flocks with Red Crossbills.If you find a flock of Red Crossbills in a spruce, try to get good looks at all the birds you can – the white wing bars will really stand out. They do have distinctive voices as well, including a chattering call that one Oregon birder has compared to “a flock of kingfishers.” The general pattern in Crossbills is to call a lot while flying, but to be pretty quiet when feeding.The post Sitka Sedge State Natural Area now open! appeared first on Tillamook Coast.
Source: Visit Tillamook Coast

Read More